How the new Adult Social Care Certificate will support local skills needs

What is the new qualification is, who is it for, and what opportunities does it present for colleges and training providers to their support communities

What is the new qualification is, who is it for, and what opportunities does it present for colleges and training providers to their support communities

12 Jun 2024, 5:00

While we’re in the middle of an election campaign, you could be forgiven for missing the launch of the new Adult Social Care Certificate.

A result of the Skills for Care commissioning by the Department for Health and Social Care (DHSC), the ambition is to support people to not only remain in the social care workforce but build a rewarding and fulfilling career.

It also offers an opportunity for increased collaboration between training providers and local employers and greater community support for some of the most vulnerable people.

Who is it for?

Adult social care depends on the dedication of millions providing care. But the sector is facing a severe recruitment and retention crisis.

There are more people working in adult social care than the NHS – 1.54 million on average compared to 1.3 million – and the sector’s predicted to grow by almost half a million jobs by 2035. Nevertheless, it faces an average turnover rate of 28.5 per cent per year.

Primarily aimed at those who enter without a qualification, the new Care Certificate is for people currently working in social care without professional certification. According to Skills for Care, this represents more than half (54 per cent) of the workforce.

The DHSC’s ambition is for everyone who works in care to feel valued and recognised. They want to build a workforce of the right size with the right skills to meet the growing need for care and support. This is a difficult ask that’s made more challenging with the news that the original £53.91m for 37,000 fully-funded places has been postponed due to the election.

While I’m disappointed and hope the next government picks this up urgently following July’s outcome, we’ve launched the qualification as we firmly believe that the Adult Care Certificate is a valuable tool in helping to raise standards and professional outcomes.

What will the impact be?

Social care is served by an aging workforce, meaning a pipeline of talent is crucial to maintaining a pool of skilled staff. It’s essential that quality training pathways such as the Care Certificate, which is aimed at those aged 19 and over, encourage younger people into the sector.

Unless they have direct experience of care, it will continue to be unfamiliar to younger workers. Skills for Care reported that only a quarter of the current workforce is aged 25 or under.

A lack of opportunities for progression is also a common criticism, but the new Care Certificate will allow people to explore different types of roles. With training providers and their facilities enhancing delivery, there will be far greater opportunities for professional development.

For example, as well as a package of free resources to support delivery, NCFE is offering an additional funded qualification alongside the Care Certificate, creating opportunities to specialise in areas such as dementia support, end-of-life care or assisting people with learning disabilities.

The new qualification, along with the additional specialist training areas, also brings opportunities for Local Skills Improvement Plans to provide a clear focus on social care requirements, delivered through community partnerships.

Looking ahead

I urge the next government, whoever it may be, to revisit the funding promises as soon as it’s in place. This qualification is not only a much-needed investment in our social care workforce, it’s an investment in the care of the entire nation.

Social care needs more recognition as a professional career, and carers themselves must feel empowered to deliver high-quality care and develop and progress in their careers.

Through recognising skills, more people will be able to visualise a role that is both rewarding in its nature but, crucially, also delivers on providing progression opportunities and the building blocks of a successful career.

We recognise the need to make sure we’re equipping individuals with the knowledge and skills they need to work with some of society’s most vulnerable people. But it’s much more than certification; it’s about empowering our carers to understand the profound impact they have on society.

Latest education roles from

A Level Biology Teacher

A Level Biology Teacher

Barnsley College

Electrical Installation Trainer

Electrical Installation Trainer

Barnsley College

Sessional Science Lab Technician

Sessional Science Lab Technician

Merton College

Sessional Lecturer – Plumbing

Sessional Lecturer – Plumbing

South Thames College

Lecturer – Business (x 1 Banking Specialism & x 1 Accounting/Business Finance Specialism)

Lecturer – Business (x 1 Banking Specialism & x 1 Accounting/Business Finance Specialism)

Kingston College

Apprentice Development Leader

Apprentice Development Leader

GP Strategies

Sponsored posts

Sponsored post

Why we’re backing our UK skills ‘Olympians’ (and why you should too)

This August, teams from over 200 nations will gather to compete in the sticky heat of the Paris summer...

Advertorial
Sponsored post

Is your organisation prepared for a major incident?

We live in an unpredictable world where an unforeseen incident or environmental event could disrupt a Further Education (FE)...

Advertorial
Sponsored post

A new chapter in education protection!

Gallagher is a specialist in the Further Education sector, working with over 75% of Further Education colleges in the...

Advertorial
Sponsored post

Pearson is planting the seed for sustainability talent with new HTQ

Sustainability is rapidly becoming a key organisational goal for many businesses looking to make a difference in society, the...

Advertorial

More from this theme

Qualifications

Revealed: 74 qualifications survive 2025 level 3 course cull

Approved 'alternative' qualifications can be funded alongside A-levels and T Levels

Shane Chowen
Qualifications, T Levels

DfE renames struggling T Level transition programme

Officials think the name change will improve progression to T Levels

Shane Chowen
Politics, Qualifications

Labour pledges to pause and review BTECs cull

Party would not defund any AGQs under the current timeline if it wins the next general election

Billy Camden
Long read, Qualifications, Skills reform

Destination defund: the fight to save travel and tourism courses

High-profile workforce shortages in the travel industry haven’t stopped the government’s plans to defund rafts of popular courses. Jessica...

Jessica Hill

Your thoughts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *