Movers and Shakers: Edition 170

Movers and Shakers: Edition 170

Milton Keynes College has announced the appointment of Imelda Galvin as chief operating officer.

The newly created role has given Ms Galvin responsibility for finance, facilities and project implementation.

The college’s board of governors said Ms Galvin’s strong skillset, around financial strategy, project implementation and building high performance teams, was key to her appointment.

She has previously worked with global professional services firm KPMG, where she served as chief operating officer and associate partner.

On announcing Ms Galvin’s appointment, MK College’s principal Dr Julie Mills, said she was “extremely pleased” to have completed the recruitment.

“Everyone connected with the college is delighted to welcome Imelda to our senior leadership team,” she said.

“She brings a wealth of commercial experience and knowledge, as a result of a long and successful career to date, and we are privileged to be able to now benefit from that skillset within the education sector.”

Chair of the college’s board of governors, Fola Komolafe, said: “Imelda was undoubtedly the perfect candidate for the position and everyone on the board was delighted to secure her services.”

Meanwhile, Chris Hatherall has taken the reins at Mansfield’s Vision Studio School from interim principal Heather Scott.

Mr Hatherall, who joined from Wigan University Technical College where he spent four years as principal, said he wants to make the school “a centre of excellence” in preparing young people for the world of work.

Vision Studio School, which opened in September 2014, is an alternative to mainstream education for 14 to 19-year-olds.

It allows students to specialise in either engineering or health and social care, alongside core GCSEs, through project-based classroom learning and work placements with employers.

Mr Hatherall said: “The school addresses the mismatch in expectations between employers and school-leavers by ensuring students gain the qualifications, work experience and ‘softer skills’ that organisations demand.

“I’m especially excited by the specialisms in engineering and health and social care. Tens of thousands of vacancies will need filling in these sectors over the next ten years across the UK — and the school is well-placed to play its part by supplying highly-trained workers.”

Mr Hatherall has held a number of posts in the secondary education sector since qualifying as a teacher in 1997, including head of technology at Whalley Range High School and vice principal at Wellacre Technology College, both in Manchester.

And Guy Lacey has been appointed as the permanent principal of Coleg Gwent after holding the position on an interim basis at the South Wales college since August last year.

Chair of governors, Angela Lloyd said Mr Lacey had demonstrated “strong leadership, diplomacy, support for innovation and an entrepreneurial approach” during his time as interim principal.

“He has also proven his commitment and dedication to making Coleg Gwent the most successful and highest achieving college in Wales,” she added.

Mr Lacey began his career with Lloyds Bank but has more than 20 years of experience at a number of schools and colleges in the UK.

He has also worked as an examiner for the University of Cambridge examinations syndicate as well as a peer inspector with Estyn, the education inspectorate in Wales, for more than 10 years.

Mr Lacey said: “I’m delighted to be given the opportunity to continue in the role of principal, working with staff and students, to continue the progress we are making in these challenging, but exciting times.

“The expertise and commitment of staff at Coleg Gwent will allow us to continue to offer excellent service to our local communities.”